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How to catch a LingCod

 
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GovenorJ
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 1:17 pm    Post subject: How to catch a LingCod Reply with quote

Someone knows the answer to this so maybe they could tell me the best way to catch a Ling Cod. I've tried lots of lures and even cut herring spinners. One guy said catch a small fish and use that. How does that go. Question
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frogscraps
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Joined: 27 Apr 2006
Posts: 23
Location: Portland

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 10:33 pm    Post subject: Ling Cod Reply with quote

Try this link. It has lots of information.

http://www.alaskanfishing.com/fishing-for-ling-cod.htm
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Capt'n Crunch



Joined: 25 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2006 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a good link. It also talks about Ling Cod taking smaller fish which is how we catch them. First we catch a small rock cod and then we make sure he is hooked well and we put him back over and let him swim back to the bottom. When we feel a big pull or heavey weight on the line, we reel it in slowly and have a long handled fish net handy. Just before the Ling breaks the surface he'll let go and the trick is to have him in the net beforehand!
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Hal C
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Joined: 09 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 9:40 am    Post subject: How to catch a LingCod Reply with quote

Here’s a great article on how to catch a Lingcod, posted here with permission from Tony Floor of NMTA. Have fun reading it, we sure did!

It's Lingcod Fishing Time

Hooray, hooray, it's the first of May. Lingcod fishing opens today!

Pity the poor lingcod. Ugly, slow, teeth like a chain saw and cannibalistic. How many fish can you name that wouldn't hesitate to eat their own? Meet Mr. and Mrs. Lingcod, the toothy critter, cruising the depths of Puget Sound, prepared to eat anything that looks at it the wrong way. Reminds me of my old boss. And, with a scientific name like Ophiodon elongates, how will the poor lingcod ever get any respect? What do you think the lingcod's buddies call it? "Hey Ophie elong, wanna go eat an octopus?"

Lingcod are one of my favorite saltwater fish of the northwest. I wear raingear, regardless of the weather when I fish for lingcod. When I put the gaff or the net to my first lingcod of the season, I slobber on myself thinking about fresh lingcod, cooked quickly in light olive oil with a thin crust of Panko. Oh baby, help me now!

I was introduced to lingcod fishing 30 years ago off Lime Kiln point, on the west side of San Juan Island in about 150 feet of water. My teacher was Russ Orrell, a fisheries biologist from north Puget Sound who knew the drill. As he slipped the net underneath the 30-pound monster and hauled it into the boat, the fish exploded like an alligator in the swamp with a rope around its neck. I thought we were both dead. After subduing this incredible fish with his attitude adjuster club, Russ said, "Tony, look at this fish's stomach pouch. This lingcod just had lunch." Russ opened the fish and out popped a six-foot long tentacle of an octopus. I stopped breathing. Lesson number one for the lingcod's diet: It will eat anything it wants and it will eat it now!

Male lingcod grow to ages of about 14 while female lings achieve upward of 20 years. In those 20 years, they can grow to as large as 70 pounds. They range from the Gulf of Alaska to central California, with the most robust populations located off the central British Columbia coast.

The Puget Sound season is very short, beginning on May 1st and closing on June 15th with a minimum size of 26-inches and a maximum size of 40-inches. The daily limit is one per day.

There are several things to consider when searching for lingcod. First, find the words "rky" on a marine chart. Rocky is synonymous with lingcod habitat. The more rocky the habitat, as in vertical relief in the bottom structure, the more likely you will find lingcod condos.

Second, tide and current is very important. I look for a foot or less of current between tide changes. Third, when dropping offerings to a potential customer, fish vertically. Remember, the bottom is very grabby and you will go through terminal gear faster than you can tie it on, if you do not fish vertically. Hit the bottom, get off instantly within a few feet, with a jigging motion to put action on your offering and to prevent hang-up on the deck.

The lingcod feeds like a terrorist. Hit and run, baby. It will grab your bait and attempt to return quickly to its condo. Hang on tight and let the wresting match begin. If you are successful in the tug-of-war, getting the lingcod out of its house, it will come to the surface without resistance. Similar to halibut fishing, that's when it gets interesting.

If you choose to gaff, do not release the lingcod from the gaff until you have adjusted its attitude. If you choose to bring it in the boat with a salmon landing net, hang on. Hopefully it will not destroy your net before doing a drum roll between its eyes, where, in this case, was formerly its brain.

Finally, cut one of the gill rakers immediately to bleed the fish out. The heart will pump up to a couple of minutes, and you have that amount of time for the fish to voluntary pump most of the blood out of its system. If you do not bleed your fish, the white filets removed from the lingcod will look like you caught it using a 12-gauge shotgun. Most importantly, blood causes fish to taste fishy. Quality fish, like lingcod, should not taste fishy.

May is a great month for lingcod and halibut fishing. I love to fish for lingcod and I have caused mass faintings around my dinner table. Look out your window. That's me trailering north to the lingcod grounds. Here Ophio-ophio, come to your daddy.
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Reel Loose



Joined: 10 Oct 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 4:59 pm    Post subject: How to catch a Ling Cod Reply with quote

Super article. Tony Floor looks to know his stuff. I've failed they last couple of times trying to catch lingcod so I've been talking to lots of people about how to catch them and its all right here. Even how to bleed'm. Impressive - thanks!
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